This is topic Improved Towing Milage in forum SCCA San Francisco Region at Spec Miata Community.


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Posted by Jim Venable (Member # 19144) on :
 
While this topic is not Miata specific I figured why not give it a go and if deemed not appropriate, then by all means feel free to remove it.

Tow vehicles.
While opinions have been sought for tow vehicles and trailers I thought it might be helpful to discuss in a generic manner what some have done to improve ones towing miles per gallon besides the basics such as tire pressure and so forth. Certainly there is a ton of stuff on the internet but does it work is the question. Considering we have a bundle of towing miles behind us perhaps you’ve found and used an item or two that indeed was beneficial. While asked in a generic manner I wouldn’t be the least bit offended if by chance anyone's had success improving a 95 Chevrolet Crew Cab Silverado, four wheeled 350 carbureted automatic with tow package as an example.

Jim
“Nice Guy Jim Racing”
 
Posted by fishguyaz (Member # 3927) on :
 
jim
i sold a similar truck to your for a deisel. 2x the mileage, and it pulls like nothing is back there.
I have a 4,000 lb cabover camper in the bed, and am hauling a 24' enclosed trailer with it.
no regrets.
Josh
 
Posted by Brian Ghidinelli (Member # 2327) on :
 
Check out Air Tabs:

http://www.airtab.ca/index.htm

I haven't installed them myself but a friend did and he said that in certain places where his truck would keep downshifting from 5th to 4th it would stay in 5th. Next season I'm planning to tow further so I might put a set on.
 
Posted by Richard Pressman (Member # 1914) on :
 
You might want to check this out:

A "Nose Cone" for your trailer
 
Posted by Muda (Member # 3309) on :
 
Air Tabs......

If you chrome plate 'em and put them on the rear quarter do you think they count as mirrors? [Confused]
 
Posted by Ron Alan (Member # 23433) on :
 
Really no downside to diesel(maybe noise). Once you've towed with one you'll never own another gas truck. 17mpg towing most anything on freeway(7.3L Turbo Ford)
 
Posted by Zauskycop (Member # 19955) on :
 
I own a diesel myself (06 Chevy 2500) and towing an enclosed 20' trailer I get around 14 mpg.

The one argument I have heard against diesels is (and it is a pretty solid one) that you can buy ALOT of gas for the $4000 premium you pay for a diesel.

That said, a diesel engine should last you at least 250000 miles.
 
Posted by JACK MARTIN (Member # 2754) on :
 
I have always towed with a Suburban and currently a 28' enclosed trailer. I installed a nose cone last year and I picked up 1 to 1.5 MPG. It also is more stable is cross winds.
I just bought a 07 Chevy Duramax crewcab and used it for the first time last weekend. I was a little disappointed in the mileage (10.5). The truck still has an open bed and the floor of the plastic bed liner lifted up 10" or so above the top of the tailgate. Obviously a lot of mileage killing aero drag. A truck cap should cure that. Has anyone done any computer re-programing with good results?
Jack
 
Posted by dtfastbear (Member # 2337) on :
 
It is remarkable (and not surprising, once you think about it) how much HOW you drive when towing affects your mileage. When I'm towing, I drive like a granny around town (accelerate very slowly) and look way ahead to avoid having to brake hard and/or stop. Also, you can experiment and find the "sweet spot" mph to drive on the highway to maximize economy.

Towing a featherlite open trailer with the miata and a full load of racing gear with my V8 4Runner, I've seen my mileage vary between 10.5 and 15.4 for the same route to/from Thunderhill depending on how I drive (gas-be-damned-I-want-to-get-home or let's-see-how-little-gas-I-can-use).

I haven't had the Yukon XL 2500 long enough to see how much of a variation I get.

Cheers,

Dean
 
Posted by Ron Alan (Member # 23433) on :
 
No doubt 55mph is your best gas saver hands down...if you can handle it [banghead]

As mentioned above, I've heard the new diesel trucks not getting the milage of the earlier models...maybe the torque/HP arms race? But climbing a grade with a full load and never slowing down sure is nice!
 
Posted by Kyle Burkhardt (Member # 26745) on :
 
I tow an open (heavy steel) trailer with an '05 5.7 Suburban. I can get everything I need for the track in the truck. My friend has a new Tahoe with a 5.7 and he tows a 20' enclosed. I get twice the mileage that he does (12 v 6) on identical trips doing identical speeds.

Convinced me I don't want an enclosed.
 
Posted by TR6 (Member # 16732) on :
 
My biggest problem with fuel economy when towing is that I'm always running late which means I'm driving it like I stole it. Normal speed for me is 75 mph and I often run at 80 in some stretches of highway. MPG really drops at that speed. I have a Ford Superduty 7.3L diesel with a programmer. If I ever manage to keep my foot out of it and run at a steady 60, I can get about 15 mpg. But 60 mph is SO boring....
 
Posted by Wreckerboy (Member # 797) on :
 
Without a question driving habits are the single biggest influence on towing MPG for us ('04 E350 V10 towing an open).

If I'm in "take our time, have a nice ride" mode and behave myself we can see 12-14 MPG on the way there. However, if I am in "I just want to get home" mode the mileage drops dramatically. There is a large difference in mileage just between running at 70 vs. 75. Even over our 280 mile commute to SP that only works out to a 15 minute trip difference, yet it's 10 vs. 14 MPG, which on my truck means a (theoretical) extra 120+ miles on the tankful. Factor in the additional time savings for not having to make additional fuel stops and it adds up.

Too bad this all sounds good and I'm usually in "I just want to get home" mode anyway...
 
Posted by Motor City Hamilton (Member # 13046) on :
 
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dKTOyiKLARk

A BMW 3 is more fuel efficient than a Prius.
 
Posted by jensen (Member # 4190) on :
 
I tow a 44' 5th wheel with a 2004 f350 dually. The truck is 4x4, which means it has 4:10 diff. Over 62 mph the struck will start to loose mileage(FYI- single rear Fords have 3:73 which has a 200rpm difference in engine speed, equalling +1mpg). Now in stock form this truck gets 14mpg empty/10mpg towing. I now have 214,000 miles, custom programmer, EGR delete, modified turbo, intake, full exhaust, down pipe, injectors, etc. and now get 17mpg empty/14mpg towing! The turck in ran daily in the "towing" mode, and HAULS A** for a 7800lb. tank.
Things to consider:
1.Diesels are expensive to own and repair
2.Newer diesels are plaqued with emission issues, which is why some of the newer rigs are getter terrible mileage.
3.How often/how far are you towing? If it is far/and/or often the diesel will destroy the gas version. Diesels can maintain its speed, effectively stay cool and can last for Hundreds of thousand miles. If you tow a single open trailer and pull a few times a year, I'd be hard pressed to own a diesel due to complexity and cost.
4.I have 3/4 ton GMC pickup, 4x4, 5.7, 700R4 and occasionally tow an open car hauler with no problems. This is a nice simple tow package to consider that could be in the <$10,000 range, including trailer.
Good luck...
 
Posted by Nigel Stu (Member # 5001) on :
 
Take a look at the heavy-trucking industry for some ideas. Those trailers with the big boards under them have them for a reason. As well as the trailers with the rear end caps.

My bro works for a fluid dynamics software company; they have looked into these things (among others) attempting to find best improvements in fuel efficiency. He mentioned that the boards under the trailer had a significant improvement (I'm remembering somewhere around 6-7%, but am most likely way off)


-Less air under the truck/trailer via airdam on truck, deeper rocker panels on truck, rear wheel-well covers, and side-boards on trailer
-smoother surfaces everywhere - flat bottom on truck/trailer
-properly sized/placed mudflaps (yes, a study was done on this!)
-there's more. get creative [Smile]


We always try to get our race cars as close to min weight so we can go as fast as possible. Getting the rig to a lower weight will help fuel economy too. Do you REALLY need that spare engine every weekend? And can you wait until you get close to the track to buy your gas and food supplies for the weekend?


FWIW - I'm running a 2008 Chevy 2500 w/ Diesel with 55k miles, only 'mod' is the tonneau cover, Amsoil, towing my 1.6L on a 18ft featherlite open.

Trip from Detroit to Road America, averaged over 15 mpg. 75mph+ on the HWY until we hit Chicago, then as fast as we could reasonably go after that, some stop and go. Smooth sailing from Milwalkee on, 65-75 all the way in.

At 70 mph with cruise on, I've showed up at the track at 17 mpg. 70 mph unloaded with cruise on, I'll get over 21.


With the DPF, I DO notice a significant drop in MPG when the truck goes into cleaning mode. From what I've heard, Fords run theirs more often than GM.
 
Posted by Gatoratty (Member # 15983) on :
 
99 Dodge 2500 Diesel with Edge juice w/ attitude, 5" turbo back exhaust, Airaid CAI towing a 24ft Featherlight enclosed with the V-Nose. I get 24 mpg highway not towing and 15 mpg towing at 70 mph. Matt i don't know where you get the idea that diesels are expensive to own and repair and are complex. The most expensive repair on a diesel is usually the injector pump...mine cost $1865.00 to replace. Cummins 5.9L will probably go 1,000,000 miles before overhaul. The injector pump when amortized over the useful life is a small cost. I paid $7,000 for my truck with new Leer topper and spray in liner. I hardly feel the 24ft trailer behind me although I do have a Reese load leveling hitch and sway control which makes doing 75-80mph feel a whole lot better. I was going to get a Tundra, but now can't imagine not driving a diesel. i actually drive the truck every day even though it has the full size bed and crew cab.
 
Posted by Dwayne Hoover (Member # 800) on :
 
Add me to the "Diesel Ain't Worth It Unless You Need It" camp.

Everything costs more - the engine itself, the glow plugs, the $1500 injector pump (or the $250 injectors X 8), the $100 oil changes every 3K miles, the fuel, etc. You can buy 3 gas crate motors for the same money, but I bet you won't have to.

If you "need" the torque to pull your load, fine. If you "want" a diesel and have the money to spend, fine. But every time I run the actual $$$ numbers, diesel is a loser that takes 7+ years to break even ... and that math assumes you have a "good" pre-2007 version.

The 1990s was a different story. Diesel was $0.30-$0.70 per gallon cheaper and there was no EGR, no DPF, Rotella had a bunch of zinc phosphate, and the fuel had a bunch of sulfur.

2007 to present for diesels is like 1973 to 1981 was for gas motors. If you are going to buy a diesel, buy a pre-2005 or sit tight and wait for them to get the "clean" diesels right.

Just my opinion ... as a diesel owner, but definitely not a diesel lover. [twocents]
 
Posted by Dwayne Hoover (Member # 800) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Jim Venable:
While asked in a generic manner I wouldn’t be the least bit offended if by chance anyone's had success improving a 95 Chevrolet Crew Cab Silverado, four wheeled 350 carbureted automatic with tow package as an example.

Jim
“Nice Guy Jim Racing”

Buy a wideband 02 setup and learn how to tune/refurb that carb for perfect lean idle and highway cruising.

Then move the 02 to your racecar.
 
Posted by Scottie (Member # 3779) on :
 
quote:
I was going to get a Tundra, but now can't imagine not driving a diesel. i actually drive the truck every day even though it has the full size bed and crew cab.


I just bought a Tundra. First truck I have ever owned. I am loving it, and have no problem towing my 20ft enclosed. However, I do envy the diesels that are tuned and get to blow black smoke all over everyone.
 
Posted by Ron Alan (Member # 23433) on :
 
Ok, what is DPF? I have a 2000 F250 7.3...I'm going to assume this doesn't apply to my truck?
 
Posted by Mark (Member # 471) on :
 
Ron,

See here:

http://alternativefuels.about.com/od/glossary/g/dpf.htm
 
Posted by Wreckerboy (Member # 797) on :
 
Diesels cost more up front for buy in, be it new or used. Diesels also have expenses that are unique to them. While diesels can be worth it, my numbers said that you had to meet a very particular set of criteria that usually involves putting 100K miles per year on or more and if you plan on keeping the vehicle for 400K or longer.

Check the ROI. When I bought my V10 Furd, as somebody who tows 5K a year or so a diesel wasn't going to pay off unless my (potential future) grandchildren inherited the truck!
 
Posted by Zauskycop (Member # 19955) on :
 
$100 oil changes every 3000 miles?? Are you nuts?

I use the oil life monitor in my Chevy 2500 and it NEVER is even close at 3K miles. Typical range is about 7500 miles or MORE before it calls for an oil change...
 
Posted by Dr.Dan (Member # 2040) on :
 
Hell, My wife's Bimmer only get oil changes as per manu inst every 15K
 
Posted by jbenoit28 (Member # 3051) on :
 
You guys seem to tow pretty fast. I'm usually around 65MPH and that seems to be the sweet spot for MPG. I get about 12.5MPG towing a 28' Enclosed with two SM's, tools and gear with an 05 Diesel Excursion. Without towing I can get about 19.5 to 21MPG, more if it's raining [Smile]

Not sure about the expense of diesels over Gas. We made the switch from a 06 Expedition 5.4L to the 05 Excursion 6.0L. Have more room, more power and more MPG's. They were both used at the time we bought them, and the Excursion was $1500 cheaper. Best MPG with a 20' enclosed behind the Expedition was 7.5MPG and about 15MPG not towing.

My trailer is dictating my tow vehicle but I'd still keep a diesel if I had to tow anything over 5000#'s often. I'd like to look into those bubbles for the front of the trailer as my pace is a brick. I have also found that driving style is very much related to mpg in my truck as I always have better results than my lead-footed wife.

Joe
 
Posted by Blake Thompson (Member # 1571) on :
 
Chevy Silvardo 3500 with 2500lb slide in camper and 3000 lb stacker trailer with two spec miatas and gear:
55mph == 9.49 mpg
65 == 8.5mpg
70mph == 7.8 mpg

454 isn't cheap, but the wear and tear at 70mph and the safety issues are definitely not worth it. It was several thousand cheaper than a comparable diesel and I just don't put the mileage to justify spending the extra 2-3k, or in my case 40-60% more money. Considering the hole im cutting through the interstate air I don't think there is a doohickey that will produce better mileage than just behaving with the accelerator and spending another 20m - 1 hr on the road. Certainly nothing cheaper.
 
Posted by Dwayne Hoover (Member # 800) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Ron Alan:
Ok, what is DPF? I have a 2000 F250 7.3...I'm going to assume this doesn't apply to my truck?

Diesel Particulate Filter. It gathers soot and then the truck initiates a "controlled chimney fire" (using diesel fuel) to clean it up. Bad for fuel economy, bad for reliability (so far).

Your 2000 7.3 doesn't have it, and in my opinion you have one of the best combination of truck and engine you can buy - run it into the ground and hope the new oil and new fuel doesn't make your "old" engine wear out prematurely.

Of particular concern for your motor are the injectors wearing out due to lubricity and anti-scuff agents being taken out of the fuel and oil. At $250/injector X 8, you should be considering a lubricity additive for your fuel.
 
Posted by Dwayne Hoover (Member # 800) on :
 
Miles Per Gallon means nothing.

Cents Per Mile is what we should be talking about.
 
Posted by Drago (Member # 1406) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Dwayne Hoover:
[QUOTE]Originally posted by Ron Alan:
[qb] Your 2000 7.3 doesn't have it, and in my opinion you have one of the best combination of truck and engine you can buy - run it into the ground and hope the new oil and new fuel doesn't make your "old" engine wear out prematurely.


I AGREE 100%, LOOKING FOR ONE MYSELF!
 
Posted by Blake Thompson (Member # 1571) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Dwayne Hoover:
Miles Per Gallon means nothing.

Cents Per Mile is what we should be talking about.

that assumes you intend to use the truck up to it's complete fullness during the course of your racing career... otherwise its a matter of cost per year over a period of time. I don't intend to die with my truck, i intend to put 10-15k/yr on it.
 
Posted by SCCA_Racer (Member # 24816) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Dwayne Hoover:
Cents Per Mile is what we should be talking about.

I agree with you there Dwayne on what we are comparing.
I have a 2008 Tundra Double Cab Limited. I will look up my milage and post it a little bit later. I can honestly say I must be one of the slowest trailer draggers on here as I do 55-60mph. I usually like to find a big rig and try to reasonably stay in his wake while not following to close. I am thinking about enclosing the front of my open tralier and adding skirt underneath. I will be collecting data throughout this next season to see how to get the the best fuel economy.

One thing I wanted to ask is if any of you are running water injection to increase mileage?
 
Posted by TR6 (Member # 16732) on :
 
One thing some are forgetting is the resale value of the diesel option versus gasoline. I have a 2001 F250 7.3 diesel. When I bought it new, the diesel option was $3600 over the base 5.4 gas engine. Last I checked, on resale, a used 2001 F250 7.3 diesel is still worth about the same amount more than a 5.4 gas version of the same year model. The diesels hold their value much more than the V8 or V10 gas version of the same truck (at least with the F250's, I can't speak for Dodge or GM).

Granted, if you don't need the diesel for towing, it's a waste. But I submit that even if you tow an open steel trailer with one car and a rack full of tires and a toolbox full of gear, a diesel does it much better than a gas engine. I've caravaned with other guys with Chevy half ton gas engine trucks towing home from a race weekend. I got tired of holding back my pace waiting on them to catch up while climbing hills. Meanwhile, they're downshifting all over the place to try to keep up. [Smile]

And 3K mile oil changes in a diesel? Hell I thought I was obsessive because I change mine every 5K miles. And Blackstone Labs keeps telling me to go to at least 7500 miles when they check my oil samples.
 
Posted by Ron Alan (Member # 23433) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Dwayne Hoover:
quote:
Originally posted by Ron Alan:
Ok, what is DPF? I have a 2000 F250 7.3...I'm going to assume this doesn't apply to my truck?

Diesel Particulate Filter. It gathers soot and then the truck initiates a "controlled chimney fire" (using diesel fuel) to clean it up. Bad for fuel economy, bad for reliability (so far).

Your 2000 7.3 doesn't have it, and in my opinion you have one of the best combination of truck and engine you can buy - run it into the ground and hope the new oil and new fuel doesn't make your "old" engine wear out prematurely.

Of particular concern for your motor are the injectors wearing out due to lubricity and anti-scuff agents being taken out of the fuel and oil. At $250/injector X 8, you should be considering a lubricity additive for your fuel.

Thanks for the info DH...No doubt Ford has had issues with every attempt at a new diesel since the 7.3. Maybe the latest attempt at their own motor will prove more reliable. After 10 yrs I only have 70k so I think I'll have this quite awhile [yep]
 
Posted by Steven Holloway (Member # 2306) on :
 
Yep. My '01 7.3 Excursion just turned 105k last month.
With a few mods, ie:intake, exhaust, chip, dual hp oil pumps, it'll smoke every HS kid's car in the neighborhood while carrying 7 in comfort.
I get about 12 towing my 24', 1' extra heighth Pace at 70. Of course, I'm usually in a hurry and run 75, so call it 11 mpg. I'm sure it would do 14 towing if I could stand to drive 65 or less.
 
Posted by Dwayne Hoover (Member # 800) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Blake Thompson:
quote:
Originally posted by Dwayne Hoover:
Miles Per Gallon means nothing.

Cents Per Mile is what we should be talking about.

that assumes you intend to use the truck up to it's complete fullness during the course of your racing career... otherwise its a matter of cost per year over a period of time. I don't intend to die with my truck, i intend to put 10-15k/yr on it.
Your assumption about my assumption is wrong, I think. [Smile]

Whether you buy your truck brand new, put 10 miles on it and trade it in the next day ... or whether you buy a 5 year old truck and drive it 50 years until you die, the "Cents Per Mile" calculation is as valid as the data you put into it (and certainly more valid than "miles per gallon", which is meaningless when the fuel source and fuel cost isn't identical).

The same goes for hybrids, plug-in electrics, scooters, etc. "100 miles per gallon" means nothing because my employer doesn't pay me in "gallons". [Big Grin]

I encourage everyone to use total cost models for everything in their lives that they have a financial concern with. Include resale value and depreciation. Include insurance costs. Include the worth of your "enjoyment". Include anything and everything you can account for. If you don't, you are just BS-ing yourself.
 
Posted by Dwayne Hoover (Member # 800) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Drago:
quote:
Originally posted by Dwayne Hoover:
[QUOTE]Originally posted by Ron Alan:
[qb] Your 2000 7.3 doesn't have it, and in my opinion you have one of the best combination of truck and engine you can buy - run it into the ground and hope the new oil and new fuel doesn't make your "old" engine wear out prematurely.


I AGREE 100%, LOOKING FOR ONE MYSELF!
You own a salvage yard. Put a Cummins engine in a Ford chassis with an Allison transmission robbed from a GMC [Smile]
 
Posted by jensen (Member # 4190) on :
 
Ford SuperDuty chassis, Cummins powerplant and an Allision trans. Kit is available to run a Cummins, both common rail and 4 valve in a Ford. Info is available in Diesel Power magazine. Next months mag will have an article about the marriage of all three.

FYI-I will tell you all that diesels are expensive, I own a garbage hauling company and we run 16 trucks daily. I will continue to own/operate a diesel dually as a daily driver. I believe as a package, the hauling, towing, snow plowing and kid hauling that my truck sees has advantages with "heavy-duty" chassis components. Other than routine maintainence and diesel/emission items, all of the running gear is oem.
 
Posted by Derek Luney (Member # 1421) on :
 
Someone tell me if I did something wrong but I replaced the rotella in my 7.3L ford with Mobil's version of diesel truck oil. Scientific reason: Sam's club sells Rotella in 3 gallon cases and Mobil in 2 gallons a box. The ford needs 4 gallons an oil change.

To my surprise gas mileage improved 18% towing or not.
 
Posted by Ron Alan (Member # 23433) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Derek Luney:
Someone tell me if I did something wrong but I replaced the rotella in my 7.3L ford with Mobil's version of diesel truck oil. Scientific reason: Sam's club sells Rotella in 3 gallon cases and Mobil in 2 gallons a box. The ford needs 4 gallons an oil change.

To my surprise gas mileage improved 18% towing or not.

Only thing different was oil?? [Eek!] I would love to know if we have an option to Rotella...anyone else have similar experience? We are still talking towing and MPG here [Big Grin]
 
Posted by Derek Luney (Member # 1421) on :
 
Nothing different but the oil. Just towed to the ARRC. Usually on vapors from home on 1 full tank. This time went to the alignment shop in the AM (41 miles) and still had 51 estimated miles in the tank.

AVG 11.2. Usual 9.6 (2000 F250 7.3 4x4, 20 foot enclosed, bed cover) I did see the same improvement with 55-60 MPH instead of 70MPH back when gas was $4 but this was the routine 70mph trek.

Mentioned this to someone at the track who pointed out they had a work truck with 1 million miles on the engine on Rotella. I don't want to hurt the engine but it's hard to ignore that improvement just from a brand change.
 
Posted by Steven Holloway (Member # 2306) on :
 
Any good synthetic will do.
Powerstrokes are particularly sensitive to viscosity because of the HEUI injectors.
 
Posted by Ron Alan (Member # 23433) on :
 
quote:
Originally posted by Steven Holloway:
Any good synthetic will do.
Powerstrokes are particularly sensitive to viscosity because of the HEUI injectors.

So what viscosity is best?
 
Posted by Steven Holloway (Member # 2306) on :
 
15w40 down to regularly in the 40's or less, then 5w40.
 
Posted by Dwayne Hoover (Member # 800) on :
 
It is difficult for me to get accurate MPG readings on my truck due to the tendency of diesel fuel to foam, the related inconsistency in "gas pump kickout" sensitivity, and especially how level the truck is when I fill it up (twin-tank Ford with the tanks laying lengthways).


Cruise control is another MPG-killer, especially with hills. If you want max MPG, lightly accelerate down hills and let the extra momentum help carry it up the next hill while giving up a few MPH. This "roller coaster" technique is taught to truck drivers (who can sometimes be paid a "fuel saving bonus").
 
Posted by Steven Holloway (Member # 2306) on :
 
On the Fords you can do whats called a "Harpoon mod".
Drop the tank and remove the sender/pickup. Inside will be a 3" or so tube where the vent connects. On plastic tanks, this tube is plastic and easily cut with a PVC cutter, cut it as short as you can. The tube limits how high you can fill the tank, necessary air space for expansion in gas applications, not so much for diesel.
This mod let's you fill a couple extra gallons and makes it easier to fill through the foam. I can usually get liquid right up to the filler neck.
 
Posted by l8tbreakr (Member # 25586) on :
 
I have a 94 F-350 7.3 IDI Turbo Diesel dually towing 22' enclosed. When I switched from open trailer to enclosed went from 13-15mpg to 8-9mpg. I try to keep it at 60mph/2000 rpm and have found that drafting a big rig helps. I've thought about switching back to an open trailer for the performance and mileage - the truck used to be so capable, but this is the extent of it's capabilities - opens are more aerodynamic and lighter, and with the right one so much more convenient to move around or whatever. But it's hard to argue with having shelter and secure place to store your stuff overnight.

Check out rv.net there is a lot of good towing information there including some real world tests of the nose cone and air tabs. From what I recall, maybe 1 mpg each give or take.
 
Posted by juliancates (Member # 32370) on :
 
I had a similar reduction when going from open to enclosed. With my open trailer (towing my BMW at the time) I could get 12-13 mpg with my 2010 F-150, 5.4 gasser. I get 7-8 towing the 24' enclosed, extra height trailer at around 65-70.

Interesting point earlier about accelerating down hills and letting the momentum carry you up them. I have been using cruise control so far. I'll try to remember this the next time I tow.
 
Posted by Jim Venable (Member # 19144) on :
 
Hello all,

Wanted to take a moment to thank everyone for all the input. Most informative, educational and helpful.

Enjoy,
Jim
"Nice Guy Jim Racing"