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Author Topic: oil all over the clutch and bell housing - from where?
dtfastbear Verified Driver Made Donation to Website
faster than the average bear...

Region: SFR / NorCal
Car #: 72
Year : 93
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So I've been having some clutch and tranny issues this year... I pulled the tranny last night and found that everything in there is wet. The rubber boot where the clutch lever goes in to the bell housing was dripping.

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The entire inside of the bellhousing is covered in some sort of goopy oil residue. There are flakes of the yellow paint off the clutch spun around in the bell housing, and you can see some of the flakes above the clutch disc in the photo above. Above the bell housing - where the heater hose junction is, EVERYTHING is wet. Not sure you can see it in picture, but the rubber plug and the water temp plug are completely soaked in what appears to be engine oil.

Any thoughts on where all of this fluid might be coming from and how it's getting inside the bell housing?

Cheers,

Dean

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NASA Nor Cal SM series Director
www.molaps.com

Winner - Ford Racing Mustang Challenge Driver Shootout

Evil Genius Racing / Race Engineering / Stewart Development

d mathias Verified Driver Made Donation to Website
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Region: OVR
Car #: 88
Year : 1991
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Outside bellhousing, possible o-ring leak at the CAS. Inside the bellhousing, possible rear main seal leak, or lack of RTV on flywheel bolts.

Rob Burgoon Verified Driver
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+1, especially for the CAS o-ring. That thing likes to mutate into plastic. The flywheel bolt sealant is a good one, but I think that makes a smaller mess.

I once got my valve cover gasket out of position and that made a big mess. Eventually made the heater hose fail.

Don't forget to replace the plug and any coolant hoses that got exposed to oil. [Smile]

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It really makes my week when nobody crashes into me.

dtfastbear Verified Driver Made Donation to Website
faster than the average bear...

Region: SFR / NorCal
Car #: 72
Year : 93
Posts: 1276
Status: Offline
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Got into it a little bit more this morning.

Looks like the oil is coming from the back of the valve cover gasket. It's covered the underside of the coil pack and the back of the block. It doesn't look like the CAS is leaking, but I'm going to replace that O-ring as a preventative measure.

I pulled the flywheel and while it does look like a little bit of oil seeped from one of the flywheel bolts, it appears that oil running down the back of the block came through the block/bellhousing junction. The flat plate/gasket that goes between the block and the bell housing was COVERED in oil on both sides and was very dirty. Wondering if that little bit of dirt kept it from effectively sealing the block/tranny junction.

One other thing - when I pulled the flywheel, I noticed that the pilot bearing was pushed back in the flywheel probably 3/32nds. I know the bearing is supposed to be flush with the front of the flywheel. Would this cause any problems?

Cheers,

Dean

--------------------
NASA Nor Cal SM series Director
www.molaps.com

Winner - Ford Racing Mustang Challenge Driver Shootout

Evil Genius Racing / Race Engineering / Stewart Development

Rob Burgoon Verified Driver
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Yeah, that plate doesn't seem to seal much for me.

I wouldn't worry about the pilot bearing. No symptoms, right? When you put a new one in, you can carefully apply loc-tite blue to the outside of the outer race where it meets the flywheel before seating it.

When you install the tranny, remember to jack up the front of the engine by the oil pan to angle it so you can slip it in there without bashing the pilot bearing out of position.

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It really makes my week when nobody crashes into me.

SAE113 Verified Driver
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Region: Central Florida
Car #: 01 & 99
Year : '92 & '94
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i would consider replacing the rear main seal since your down there.

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Steven Elicati
'92 Protege ITA#01
'94 Miata ITA#99

dtfastbear Verified Driver Made Donation to Website
faster than the average bear...

Region: SFR / NorCal
Car #: 72
Year : 93
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How difficult of a job is that? Can it be done with the engine "together" and in the car?

It doesn't appear, after pulling the flywheel off, that the rear main seal is leaking, so I'm wondering if I should leave it alone. Or, should this be an annual maintenance item?

BTW - Thanks for the advice, Rob. Loctite on the outside of the pilot bearing is a good idea. And yes, I'll be replacing all the rubber parts (hoses, etc.) that were exposed to oil!

Cheers,

Dean

--------------------
NASA Nor Cal SM series Director
www.molaps.com

Winner - Ford Racing Mustang Challenge Driver Shootout

Evil Genius Racing / Race Engineering / Stewart Development

Rob Burgoon Verified Driver
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Oh yes, you can absolutely do it when you have your flywheel off.

But... you can certainly screw it up. Last time I did my rear main seal I think I might have added a few screwdriver scratches where I didn't want them. At least they are at 12, not 6.

The front main seal went like clockwork though. Cut the seal open with a razor, and then was able to neatly remove the seal with a screwdriver.

Can anyone confirm that the razor trick would work on the rear main seal?

See you up north someday soon I hope, and by all means, come visit us at buttonwillow!

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It really makes my week when nobody crashes into me.

Newt Watson Verified Driver Made Donation to Website
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Car #: 95
Year : 1994
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Rob,

I just replaced my rear main seal on a 94, and may have seated it a little too deep into the recess. Is it possible to push the rear main seal up against the crankshaft, or is there a lip that the seal seats up against before it makes it to the crankshaft. I didn't think to look for a lip until I had already put the seal in place.

Rob Burgoon Verified Driver
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No idea, I just pushed it in until it was flush. It probably can go too far.

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It really makes my week when nobody crashes into me.

Steven Holloway Verified Driver Made Donation to Website
Blue Eyes, Aquarius, hates being squeezed to the grass in SowDiv!

Region: Lonestar
Car #: 97
Year : 91
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No lip, it can definitely go too far.

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If you can't fix it with a hammer, it's got electrical problems.

Gibscreen Verified Driver Series Champ
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Year : 1995
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The bellhousing plate definitely doesn't seal--think of it more like a dust cover.

Check the rear of the headgasket while it's running. We had a very small oil leak at the rear of the headgasket and the oil seeped inside the bellhousing. Since the headgasket is right at the top of the bellhousing it was very tough to see. We only found it because we ran the engine without the tranny.

That was an interesting diagnostic session since we had to rig up a bracket for the starter to start the engine. I wouldn't recommend trying it though. It only worked sporadically. Next time we'll just cut up an old bellhousing and use the area just around the starter.

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Rob Gibson
RJ Racing
2010 NASA Nationals TTE Champion
2008/2009 WERC Champion
2007 NASA SoCal SM Champion
rjracing.net
Weekend-Racer.com

   

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