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Author Topic: Anyone seen one of these in use/action before?
Brandon F. Verified Driver
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Region: NNJR
Car #: 48
Year : 1996
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http://www.coolshirt.net/racing-port-a-cool.html

From the looks of it, instead of running cold water through the shirt they're running what is essentially what we in the IT industry call "tech spray".

Anyone have any other input they'd like to share?

This would be a quick & easy "install" as there's no wiring required and could still be used outside the car for other functions.

Thanks,
Brandon

Muda Verified Driver Made Donation to Website
ComingToAMirrorNearYou

Region: WDC
Car #: #23
Year : 1991
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I believe any pressurized system is not allowed.

--------------------
Muda Motorsports
"We're all here 'cause we're not all there."

Motor City Hamilton
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Region: Great Lakes/Detroit
Car #: 51
Year : 1994 Miata
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I used one for a season, then built my own cool box over the winter.

On Grid it's great. You have to put the return line down your leg to let it vent out by your foot. It's kinda funny to see the faces of the crew for the car griding next to you when what looks like steam or smoke starts spewing out of your foot.

I found that it only lasted about 10 minutes. I mounted the bottle within my reach while belted in. I would hit it a couple of times on grid, then on pit road as I was pulling in. One bottle would last about two on track sessions doing this grid/pit road method. I guess you could hit it again in the middle of a race, but I'm usually too busy driving and how much do you really notice the heat once you are at speed? I also don't live in the South or West, but have raced in many muggy, 90 degree days at Mid-Ohio.

I think this unit is a nice alternative if you cannot afford or cannot find the time to build the cool box yet.

zazzopizza
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Just save up a few more bucks and call Jill at F.A.S.T. She will set you up with what you need!!

It will pay for itself the first time you use it!!!

B Wilson Verified Driver Series Champ
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$180 vs. $400 or $600 from Saferacer. I'ma thinking of trying this. any others with experience?

-bw

--------------------
Bruce Wilson
2010 Oregon Region Champ
2010 Monte Shelton Driver of the Year
2010 25 Hours of Thunderhill E3 and Under 2 liter Overall Champion
Oregon Region SM Class Advisor

Glenn Verified Driver
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The advantage to the Cool Shirt (regular) system is that the connectors are compatable with the FAST system. So you enduro drivers can swap systems and still stay cool. We here in the SE can get the Cool Shirt from well known trackside vendor for far less than the quotes I see in above posts. Just Sayin,

--------------------
Glenn
Crew chief Meathead Racing, NE Region Sales Division Race Engineering, The GOLD standard in SM engines, Occasional race slave for OPM Autosports

Brandon F. Verified Driver
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Car #: 48
Year : 1996
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If you look closely at the hoses/connectors for the "port-a-cool" (my link above) you see there's an adapter to on top of the can/nozzle that hooks into the shirt.

Not a different set of shirt connectors but merely a different source & method of circulating a "cool fluid" through the shirt.

George Munson Verified Driver
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I have used the "Spray Bottle System" and would not recommend it at all. In fact we used the shirt and hoses then added our own pump, cooler and hoses to build a regular system. First the bottle doesn't last long enough. Next we had more than a few times where the bottle hose fitting came loose at the bottle so each time we sprayed we were blowing the coolant into the car. Than theres the issue of pushing the button while in a heated battle with your arch rivals. The bottom line is if you own this for $50 to $75 and a little time you can build one that performs like the real deal.

B Wilson Verified Driver Series Champ
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Can anyone give us a general idea of parts need to build one. Cooler obviously, but what about pump and number/type of connectors?

-Bruce

--------------------
Bruce Wilson
2010 Oregon Region Champ
2010 Monte Shelton Driver of the Year
2010 25 Hours of Thunderhill E3 and Under 2 liter Overall Champion
Oregon Region SM Class Advisor

Gatoratty Verified Driver Made Donation to Website
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Bilge pump from marine supply, connectors from McMaster, hose from home depot and foam tubing to insulate the hoses. If you search there are several threads with all of the part numbers to build a system. Then buy a shirt from your favorite vendor.

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Paul McLester

B Wilson Verified Driver Series Champ
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http://teamfourracing.com/?p=68

Although I'd like something a lot smaller.

-bw

--------------------
Bruce Wilson
2010 Oregon Region Champ
2010 Monte Shelton Driver of the Year
2010 25 Hours of Thunderhill E3 and Under 2 liter Overall Champion
Oregon Region SM Class Advisor

Keith in WA Verified Driver Made Donation to Website
Pack Fodder

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Bruce~
A LOT smaller might run out of cool too quickly. Jim Graffey has one about that size. He might be able to tell you if on our tracks it still has a lot of life left at the end of a race. They also make shirts that are sort of like a gell pack you put in the cooler. Don't know how well they work. I've been curious myself.

--------------------
Keith Novak
(Will work for tires)

B Wilson Verified Driver Series Champ
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I'm not trying to be comfortable, just not starve my brain of blood being redirected to my skin. I don't mind being hot, but when I get out of a 100+ degree car with a headache I know I've left something on the track (and burnt a few brain cells). I'm thinking of starting with the spray technique this summer and then decide if I really want to build something.

-b

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Bruce Wilson
2010 Oregon Region Champ
2010 Monte Shelton Driver of the Year
2010 25 Hours of Thunderhill E3 and Under 2 liter Overall Champion
Oregon Region SM Class Advisor

Kyle Keenan Verified Driver
Pass right

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Anyone looking to build their own cool shirt system, good write-up here. http://www.gt40s.com/forum/how-racing-safety-t...suit-system-ron-earp.html

What Bruce doesnt mention is that the cool shirt set-up he's looking for is for the BBQ grill at the track [Wink]

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Driver, #44 Spec Miata
ColdTrackDays.com

Niklas Falk
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quote:
Originally posted by Keith in WA:
... They also make shirts that are sort of like a gell pack you put in the cooler. Don't know how well they work. I've been curious myself.

I think you are talking about the phase-change materials which consumes heat when they melt (e.g. embedded wax particles, but not saying this one use that) and can be restored to solid form in your cooler.
E.g. http://www.pegasusautoracing.com/productdetails.asp?RecID=5151

How well they work in real-life is another matter (e.g. do they get softer and make the belt looser).

Scott Whiteman
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Just by the shirt from F.A.S.T., buy a $15.00 cooler and a $30.00 pump from Ace hardware, they also have the tube. Build it yourself much cheaper.Mine works great.

Keith in WA Verified Driver Made Donation to Website
Pack Fodder

Region: NWR / Oregon
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quote:
Originally posted by Niklas Falk:
quote:
Originally posted by Keith in WA:
... They also make shirts that are sort of like a gell pack you put in the cooler. Don't know how well they work. I've been curious myself.

I think you are talking about the phase-change materials which consumes heat when they melt (e.g. embedded wax particles, but not saying this one use that) and can be restored to solid form in your cooler.
E.g. http://www.pegasusautoracing.com/productdetails.asp?RecID=5151

How well they work in real-life is another matter (e.g. do they get softer and make the belt looser).

They make gel pack ones that are about 1/3 the price but I guess don't work as well. They make ones that don't put the packs of goo where your belts go....
http://www.icevest.com/
I'm thinking about one for a Chump Car race where I could be driving in 100* heat for 2 hr stints.

--------------------
Keith Novak
(Will work for tires)

PedalFaster Verified Driver
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quote:
Originally posted by Niklas Falk:
I think you are talking about the phase-change materials which consumes heat when they melt

How well they work in real-life is another matter (e.g. do they get softer and make the belt looser).

Another website for these is here: http://coolvest.com.

I bought one, and hope to use it for the first time this weekend, so I'll update the thread afterward. Thickness of the vest is a concern -- there are pockets for cooling packs in the front and the back, and the packs are more than an inch thick. Wearing the vest under your suit makes you look like you put on fifty pounds. [Smile]

I like to cinch my belts to the point where they're borderline painful, but that may cause problems with the vest since as you pointed out, the belts may loosen as the packs soften, and also squeezing the packs too tight could conceivably cause them to burst.

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Stephen Hui - '95 SM #86, Northwest / Oregon Region SCCA

John Mueller Verified Driver Made Donation to Website
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In SoCal I've been running a standard Cool Shirt system for the past four seasons... If I had to decide what to do today I'd probably build my own.

If time is an issue and $$ is not this is a good intro deal: Cool Shirt / Suit Starter Pack (everything-you-need)

--------------------
Thanks,
John Mueller
NASA SM National Director
http://www.Weekend-Racer.com
#13 "Tiger Miata" - 2009 SoCal SSM Champion

Motor City Hamilton
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I spent about $100 to build my own and it looks very close to the pro systems.

Bought a cooler from medical supply, a bilge pump from Marine supply used the cool shirt that I already purched with the goofy spray bottle system. I took pics throughout the build. I will post in my photo album and post the link here.

Brandon F. Verified Driver
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Region: NNJR
Car #: 48
Year : 1996
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Check out this self-built complete setup:

http://specthismiata.com/2008/08/03/homemade-cool-shirt-system/

Not too shabby....not too shabby...

Muda Verified Driver Made Donation to Website
ComingToAMirrorNearYou

Region: WDC
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Year : 1991
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Build mine from a cold therapy unit purchased on eBay for $50. Made a mount from aluminum extrusions and small ratchet straps, and wired lighted rocker switch and circuit breaker on dash. Plug compatible with Cool Shirt and works great.

--------------------
Muda Motorsports
"We're all here 'cause we're not all there."

Brian Ghidinelli Verified Driver
Moonwalker

Region: SFR
Car #: 12
Year : 99
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I have one of the phase-change vests that I've used in 110F racing before. They work well for the price but the main problem is that fresh out of the ice cheset on they are _cold_ and _hard_. Once they soften up a hair they're much better but they never freeze flat enough to not be just a bit uncomfortable when you first put it on. They are awesome when walking around the grid and in general for being outside in heat/sun.

I'm building/buying a cool suit system for this summer. Would love to have a turtleneck version for cooling the neck too.

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MotorsportReg.com / Haag Performance / Team SafeRacer
2010 San Francisco Region SMT Champion

CP Verified Driver
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I added a rheostat to control flow for short money versus the big $$$ cool shirt Temp Control thingy. In hindsight it's not really needed, as I've got it going full blast all the time but it's an option for someone that wants to control flow and add another cool looking switch/dial to the center stack.

--------------------
-Cy
Supported by LTD Racing & Speed Shack - New England's Premier Auto Accessory Store
Rt1 AutoMile - Norwood, MA
http://www.speedshackonline.com

PedalFaster Verified Driver
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quote:
Originally posted by PedalFaster:
Another website for these is here: http://coolvest.com.

I bought one, and hope to use it for the first time this weekend, so I'll update the thread afterward.

I'm not particularly impressed after my first usage. You can definitely feel the cooling effect when you first put on the vest with new cooling packs, but I can't say I got out of my car and thought, "wow, that really made a big difference to my comfort". I haven't yet figured out exactly how long the packs last, except that it's long enough for a fifteen minute session, and not long enough for two fifteen minute sessions with a half hour break in between.

The vest has pockets for cooling packs both in the front and back. The packs are pretty bulky, so I followed the advice on another thread and ran with packs in either the front or back pockets, but not both. The cooling effect was more noticeable when the packs were in the back pockets, but having them between me and my seat while driving was uncomfortable and noticeably changed my position relative to the wheel, so I ended up just running them in front.

So -- I'll report back again after using it a few more times, but right now I recommend splurging on a full-fledged cool shirt system over buying one of these (still fairly expensive) self-contained vests.

--------------------
Stephen Hui - '95 SM #86, Northwest / Oregon Region SCCA

Mark de Regt Verified Driver Made Donation to Website
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quote:
Originally posted by PedalFaster:
I'm not particularly impressed after my first usage. You can definitely feel the cooling effect when you first put on the vest with new cooling packs, but I can't say I got out of my car and thought, "wow, that really made a big difference to my comfort".

And it's worth noting that the ambient temperature didn't get over 60 yesterday.

PedalFaster Verified Driver
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quote:
Originally posted by Mark de Regt:
And it's worth noting that the ambient temperature didn't get over 60 yesterday.

That could go either way. The cool packs maintain a temperature of 59 degrees. A 59 degree cool pack that doesn't feel very cool when it's 60 degrees out (although in the car and in the suit it's quite a bit warmer) could feel very cool when it's 90 degrees out. We'll see.

--------------------
Stephen Hui - '95 SM #86, Northwest / Oregon Region SCCA

   

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